DTR by Annabel Banks (Broken Sleep Books)

  DTR is an acronym for ‘define the relationship’, a crucial question one asks the other early on in dating, and usually by text or direct message. This title serves as the scaffold for Banks’s emphatic collection which exposes the uneasy truths within our structured realities. These are poems that switch between cyber space to back … Continue reading DTR by Annabel Banks (Broken Sleep Books)

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Book Review: A Witness of Waxwings by Alison Lock

  Alison Lock’s A Witness of Waxwings is a tantalising collection concerned with metamorphosis and reminiscence. Age, retrospection and transformation emerge time and again in these brief narratives which spool imaginatively across time and place, frequently shapeshifting in form. Selkies and ghosts spook the pages, there are fast-forwarding clocks and masked villagers, there are ancient children, houses choking … Continue reading Book Review: A Witness of Waxwings by Alison Lock

& by Amy Kinsman, Published by Indigo Dreams

This debut collection is concerned with wanting and journeys of desire are curated with intimacy and aptitude. Moments of choice are given a retrospective lens. Forks in the road where on the one hand this might have happened, on the other that, human decisions made as a matter of course are plainly visible; their outcomes, … Continue reading & by Amy Kinsman, Published by Indigo Dreams

The Cartography of Others by Catherine McNamara

Catherine McNamara’s The Cartography of Others is a collection which maps out the geographies of relationships and far-flung locations with acumen and grace. These short stories are eclectic in form with a broad range of themes but each feels elastic with movement, transporting us to contemporary London, Ghana, Hong Kong and along the jagged peaks … Continue reading The Cartography of Others by Catherine McNamara

Strange Fashion by Pam Thompson, Pindrop Press (2017)

Pam Thompson’s Strange Fashion sightsees history and place in this stunning cartographic collection. With Thompson as guide, poetic map-making takes readers on a tour of Leicester, Canary Wharf and far beyond and travels the distance of the Highlands to the swollen banks of the Mississippi. One of the most striking features of these poems - which have extraordinary range … Continue reading Strange Fashion by Pam Thompson, Pindrop Press (2017)

Folk by Zoe Gilbert

  Zoe Gilbert’s debut novel Folk resists easy categorisation. Bloomsbury classify it as a novel but it might easily be interpreted as mythological flash-fictions or a set of folk tales. It's so metaphoric in language that it could sit snugly on the borders of prose-poetry and also take a pew in the aisles of social … Continue reading Folk by Zoe Gilbert

Reading Wild

My favourite place to read is outdoors. In the wild. Rugged, uncultivated spaces that are hard to reach on foot. Places which feel so majestic once I’ve arrived that they leave me feeling beautifully insignificant. For me, nothing beats discovering hidden places to read in the sunshine and the magnificent coastline of Cornwall always fits … Continue reading Reading Wild

Peach by Emma Glass

I knew Emma Glass’s ‘Peach’ would be right up my street. A surreal and visceral novella that feels more like an extended prose-poem than fiction on account of its experimental language. Twenty-two 'stages' are categorised by snappy titles: ‘Plastic Present’, ‘Kiss on My Lips, Piss on a Stick’ ‘Chop, Chop’, ‘Boom. Blast, At Last.’ This … Continue reading Peach by Emma Glass

Nostalgia in Tania Kindersley’s Goodbye Johnny Thunders

  Sometimes you read a book which mirrors where you are in life in such a karmic way that it functions as a vehicle. Gets you from one rough place to the next. Even though it’s fiction. Sometimes a book gets read and all memory of it dissolves like the whisper of a song played … Continue reading Nostalgia in Tania Kindersley’s Goodbye Johnny Thunders

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

  I read Gail Honeyman's Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine on a solitary weekend by the coast. The hotel room had pillows billowy enough to melt into. Creamy soap cubes and ribbon-tied marigolds were dotted here and there. A pile of higgledy-piggledy white towels lead me to a bath with feet. No Wif-Fi. Do Not … Continue reading Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman